Antipodeans: Australian Art

Celebration of all types of Australian art: painting, sculpture, design, performance, street art, and so on. Labour of love by Dr Zuleyka Zevallos. Submissions welcome.
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The Australian Ballet discuss the meaning of tutus.

Drawing on glass by Ghost Patrol.

Via artist’s Instagram.

Tjungkara KEN (Pitjantjatjara people, Amata, South Australia, Australia born 1969), Seven Sisters, 2012
Rocket Bore, near Mulga Park, Northern Territory, Australia
Painting, synthetic polymer paint on canvas

Via Gallery of Australia

Anne DANGAR
Australia 1887 – France 1951
Movements: France from 1930 - 1951
Plate
c.1937
Moly-Sabata, Sablons, Rhône-Alpes, Isère, France
Decorative Arts and Design, Ceramic, earthenware: underglaze painted slip decoration

Via Gallery of Australia

Heesco, Abbott , spray freehand, 2014

Via: Australian Stencil Art.

George Fetting (b. 1964), Oodgeroo of the Noonuccal Tribe, 1992 (printed 2009).
Dr Oodgeroo Noonuccal (formerly Kath Walker), was a key campaigner in the reform of the Australian constitution, Queensland state secretary of the Federal Council for the Advancement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, and recipient of the British Order in 1970 (which she returned in 1987 in protest of the bicentennial celebrations).
This photograph was taken one year prior to the Noonuccal’s death, depicting a strong, distinguished and determined leader. Griffith University Art Collection writes:

Her work and encouragement was vital for the artistic and political progress of many Black Australian poets.

Photo: via: National Portrait Gallery.

George Fetting (b. 1964), Oodgeroo of the Noonuccal Tribe1992 (printed 2009).

Dr Oodgeroo Noonuccal (formerly Kath Walker), was a key campaigner in the reform of the Australian constitution, Queensland state secretary of the Federal Council for the Advancement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, and recipient of the British Order in 1970 (which she returned in 1987 in protest of the bicentennial celebrations).

This photograph was taken one year prior to the Noonuccal’s death, depicting a strong, distinguished and determined leader. Griffith University Art Collection writes:

Her work and encouragement was vital for the artistic and political progress of many Black Australian poets.

Photo: via: National Portrait Gallery.

Australian Dance Theatre: Be Your Self - Highlights

Art by Coffs Harbour-born, Melbourne-based artist Alyson Pearson. She uses biro & watercolour.

On the second work, Pearson writes:

This work is a part of my “Animal Series”, which features quirky and whimsical animal characters with an indie edge. The buildings in this piece are inspired from around the North Melbourne area, which is where I was living at the time. The play on the word Owl, substituted to my nickname Al, is a sort of symbolism representing my move to Melbourne.

Source: Artist.

Today is the final day of ‘A State of Mind’, an exhibition by Adelaidean artist Joshua Miels (b. 1982).

All works oil on board.

Via BMG Art.

Gorgeous, whimsical watercolour of British artist David Hockney by Ghostpatrol.

Via: Backwoods on Facebook.

shiborilover:

my gradually growing coiled basket made from pandanus sourced at Mapuru in Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, Australia.

tonecones:

yes.

When Robin Boyd’s book was first published in 1960, his critique of Australia’s architectural landscape was denounced as “absolutely unpatriotic for his withering criticism of Australian aesthetics” (Phillip Adams, Late Night Live). At the time, Boyd argued for a shake up of the way in which Australians think about, teach and consume design. His book became a best seller which opened up new conversations about design.

Listen to this great Late Night Live (LNL) coverage of the 50th anniversary of Boyd’s book (from 2010).  The guests reflect on the cultural impact of Boyd’s work, drilling into Boyd’s argument about Australia’s “aesthetic calamity.” Boyd was moved to write the book because, as he saw it, Australians did not realise how bad our design was at the time (its “atrocious prettiness”).

As the Australian suburban sprawl continues to expand, the podcast guests argue that Boyd’s vivacious writing still resonates. The guests on Late Night Live argue that some critics missed Boyd’s point, which was not derision of suburbia per se. Rather Boyd sought to improve the visual landscape. This includes not just artistic vision, but also making better use of space (“medium density”). Boyd focused on “anti-featurism,” a concept focusing on necessity and “lean” design, rather than excess and superfluous detail. 

The Australian Bureau of Statistics recently reported that Australia’s population is set to double by 2050 to 46 million people. Much of this growth will occur in suburbian Melbourne and Sydney, which will each house 8.5 million people. This population expansion will require architectural ingenuity both in terms of design, maximising space, and sustainability.

totalbore:

I have decided to draw everyone. Five people at a time, decided randomly. This is #65 Keith Tognetti, Wollongong.

Full set at www.TOTALBORE.com

If you would like to be drawn then you had better add me.

ps Just because I have drawn you DOES NOT give you permission to use this image for promotional purposes, commercial gain, cover art, press images, t-shirt designs, websites, xmas cards or anything of the like. 

Feel free, however, to share this around/ make it your profile pic/ GIVE ME COMMISSIONS TO HELP ME PAY MY RENT.

Bangarra Dance Threatre, Blak

I went to see this performance in Melbourne a couple of months a go and it was memorising. The story was broken up into three acts about the spiritual journey of Indigenous Australians in urban Sydney. The first act, Scar (music below),focused on young men, alcohol and street violence.

The second act, Yearning, included only the women dancers, exploring the theme of domestic abuse and suicide. This was absolutely heart-breaking, rendered all the more profound by the use of a capella vocals in Indigenous language. This story lingers for me still, and I doubt I’ll ever forget how it made me feel.

The third act, Keepers, involved both the male and female dancers, conveying a story of transition - of Indigenous youth finding their way back to nature, culture and community. Despite the journey through disturbing issues, the performance leads to cathartic elation. The audience leaves feeling with a fervent sense of life-affirmation.

The profound social themes were all the more significant as this was a story about Indigenous struggle told from an Indigenous perspective. Bangarra’s Artistic Director Stephen Page and dancer Daniel Riley worked together on the story and choreography to provide a uniquely Australian story with universal themes of identity, emotional struggle and redemption.

The score was a collaboration between Bangarra’s composer David Page and electro-pop artist Paul Mac. Despite the emotional terrain, the music was phenomenal and made me feel like weeping and crying simultaneously. Listen to this sample.

The next Bangarra performance is Dance Clan 3, choreographed by the Bangarra Women. It’s on from  21 – 30 November  at the Bangarra Studio Theatre at Walsh Bay in Sydney.

Read more about Blak on the Bangarra website. If you’re a teacher, download the Bangarra resource.

Source: Bangarra, Blak Creative Journey Part 1. Gifs by Antipodeans.